Wednesday, April 27, 2016

281: Cloudscape Using Lilly Paint

Cloudscape, 12" x 12", Oil on Canvas
– I WAS invited to an online group about thick paint from a fellow painter from Austria. Later I discovered he was also the creator of a line of artist oil paints specially formulated for painting thickly.

The inventor, Walter Haas, told me he was inspired by this blog to create his paint and offered to send me a set. It was always my most profound hope that the blog would be a catalyst for such endeavors and I was extremely honored. In the accompanying video, I paint a cloudscape with Lilly Paints. I found the paint has a unique quality especially suited to painting with impasto and the experience, due to its textural qualities, was nearly effortless. (Read interview with Walter Haas here).

In an email, Walter related that he experimented with a wide variety of mixtures to ensure a smooth yet thick paint. The paint really is unique–combining both fluidity and the ability to paint over preceding layers without effort. My compliments to Lilly for making such a fantastic line of paint (to see their line of pigments click here).

Many thanks to Walter Haas and Lilly Paints

Brad Teare —April 2016


9 comments:

  1. Cool piece Brad. I wonder how the paints will hold up over time? If any of the components added to get these effects will affect color or such. Pretty interesting how well they just layered over each other with such ease.

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    1. In a discussion with Walter Haas he mentioned some of the ingredients he experimented with. All of them were archivally sound (like fumed silica). I have some fumed silica but have yet to experiment with it as it is somewhat toxic in powdered form (it's basically ground glass). I loved the paint. It was really pretty amazing. I'm going to experiment using the paint to paint over a previously dry painting without oiling up the canvas. Should be interesting.

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  2. Interesting how the paint rolls off the brush without sticking. Are these their artists paint or a new range not yet in their catalogue?

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    1. These are the Artist Colors in their online catalog (not the student grade). Although I believe all their colors are formulated for a similar texture. I want to interview Walter at some point to find out the differences.

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    2. Thanks Brad. I look forward to the interview.

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  3. Brad, I loved your new videos. I am intrigued with the Lilly paint and have an order ready to send. Do you have any warnings, advice, thoughts on what to buy? Right now my order includes Quin purple, Isoindol orange, phthalo blue, Hansa yellow light, titanium, burnt Umber reddish (because the dark burnt umber made an almost blue gray when mixed with Titanium. I want it just a little warmer than that.) I didn't see a true magenta, which is what I like to use as a Primary red. So I got a cool red and a warm red.
    Anyway, I'm excited. I value your opinion if you have any thoughts before I actually order.
    Thanks so much. Love your work.
    Anita Davis

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    1. Sounds fun, Anita. The strategy of getting a warm and a cool red is good. That's what I would do. Let me know how it works for you. Thanks for your comments.

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  4. Brad, glad to see that your still carrying on with your painting and blog. You are the greatest. Best Regards, Barry Snyder.

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    1. Many thanks for the kind words! I hope to carry on for awhile, at least until 300 entries. We'll see how it goes!

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Thanks for your comments!

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