Thursday, June 20, 2013

127 Painting a small landscape

In this video I paint a small 8" x 10" landscape using a purple couch (or layer of medium). I used a colored couch because it imparted the purple hue into all of my colors giving a unified color scheme. Purple is a good color to use in a composition with a lot of green because it tends to mellow and harmonize the greens. I used Cobalt violet because it is a very weak color. If I had used Dioxazine purple or Carbazole violet the couch probably would have been too insistent and would have overpowered the other colors.

Note that in order to add some more texture to the foreground (after erroneouly eliminating some really sweet strokes) I added the feel of texture by scraping into the grass and embankment with the end of my brush. You won't see this in the video but you will see the final results in the photo in the upper right (click it to enlarge).




Brad Teare June 2013

16 comments:

  1. Fun video to watch. Great composition and beautiful textures. Your landscapes have a pleasing pastoral quality to them. Speaking of which... I would be very interested to know your thoughts on seascapes, still lives, portraiture or figure painting. Why landscapes only?

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  2. Nicely done, Brad. Simple, flowing, harmonious color scheme. Well done.

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  3. Very creamy painting Brad, your pictures get increasingly rich , like cake icing. I just did a semi-thick plein air picture and thought I was using juicy paint but after a week the texture softened. I'm going to try some G-Gel for the shadow areas next time. Making thick opaque paint seems easier than thick transparent paint.

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  4. Yes, thick opaque paint is much easier to handle. By soften do you mean that the texture flattened? I generally only use g-gel to paint into. But I know many people do use it as a medium. In the field I typically only use paint right out of the tube.

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    1. Yeah "flattened" ,but also lost some sharpness and sparkle. It didn't darken, like acrylic or lighten like watercolors, but lost some life. And a few of the strokes did level out a bit. Maybe 'straight from the tube' is the way to go. I don't used a lot of medium, just enough to make the paint manageable but perhaps I should be thinking of paint more as putty than as paint. I'll try it. I use good paint, so that's not the issue, not 'hues' or student grade stuff. I'd like for it to remain as fresh as it does on day one. I'm considering using the brush as if it was a palette knife, see how that goes.

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    2. I have the same issue, but usually after I varnish the painting, the paint regains much of the freshness of when it was wet. I end up "fishing" my plein air sketches in studio a lot, so when I "oil up " the canvas again, it's easy to see what is working and what needs a little more life or pop. Many times it needs less to feel finished than I originally thought.

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    3. oops- I meant finishing, not fishing, though fishing is fun too...

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    4. Greg...I also re-work plein air paintings in the studio, never being inherently satisfied with just accurate value studies. But even before any repainting begins there's a noticeable drop-off of paint sparkle that varnish doesn't recapture, at least for me. I don't have a lot of technique goals when I paint but keeping oil paint fresh and juicy is important to me. I know it can happen because there are some passages in my work that retain the just-painted look. I want every inch to have that quality,...because a unified surface helps all the aesthetic decisions in a piece shine forth without distraction.

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    5. If you want your paints to have more gloss that doesn't go away as easily (probably will in time) add just a bit of burnt plate oil #7 to your paint. It really adds a glow to your paints. Don't overdo it though or your paint will melt just like adding too much linseed oil will do.

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  5. So Brad...any further thoughts on RGH? Still satisfied? any pigments disappoint?

    I wanted to say again how much I enjoyed this video and this painting. You really do spread some thick pigment around and I find your approach to painting to be very enjoyable.

    One of these days, I'd just love to visit Utah again and explore the state. So many interesting and diverse areas. You are lucky to be out there...!

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    1. I'm still thrilled with RGH paints. Some colors are a little creamier than other brands and some a bit stiffer but this is to be expected. The color strength is great. I bought what I think might be a replacement for my Transparent Earth Yellow but it hasn't arrived as yet.

      Utah is an amazing place to paint. Be sure to bring lots of cadmium red! (if you're painting around Moab and Zion National Park). Thanks for the feedback!

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    2. Well that's great about RGH. I was nervous about making recommendations because we all have subjective views about the materials we use. I'm also so satisfied with them.

      I had a chance to drive through southern UT for a trip (2) days. just gorgeous. I'd give anything to be back there today, painting those vistas!

      Keep up the good work, Brad.

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    3. It is beautiful here. Especially this time of year. You'll have to drop by and we will go painting next ime you're here.

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